Friday, August 2, 2019

Haiku Art with Watercolours

Haiku Watercolour Painting by Jenny James - Dragonflies Hover Above the Waterlilies Hungry are the Fish
Dragonflies Hover
Above the Waterlilies
Hungry are the Fish
by Jenny James

Who knew I could write poetry? There's a first for everything! My watercolour painting skills are constantly improving too, proving that with practice one can achieve anything.

This is my Haiku Art Page created for Pam inside her book as part of the Australian Art Journal Swap group (click here to check them out). Today's blog post is more of a journey through how my painting was created rather than the usual step-by-step but it still includes helpful information and useful tips.

Haiku Watercolour Painting by Jenny James - sketchbook image of starting out initial ideas
In the beginning... it always starts with scribbling out ideas on scrap paper then nutting them out in my journal.
To make sure my elements didn't end up like cartoon characters, I used photographs I found on the 'net of fish, waterlilies, dragonflies and underwater views for inspiration and technical details.

Writing a poem with the correct number of syllables was interesting. Once I worked out what I wanted to paint or create (dragonflies and waterlilies) and realised it didn't have to rhyme, it was much easier.

Haiku Watercolour Painting by Jenny James - sketching out the design
It was planned to be a pair of koi (mine look more like giant goldfish) swimming with the dragonflies flying overhead, with the viewpoint being from underwater.

Haiku Watercolour Painting by Jenny James - water soluble pencils to start with
Less is more... so I started with water and pencils as I'm always heavy  handed when I use paint. I coloured in areas then used a very wet watercolour brush (with soft bristles) to dissolve all the colour.
I then waited an eon for it to dry. Well, maybe 10 minutes...

Haiku Artwork by Jenny James showing the Winsor & Newton Paint Sticks
Still trying to be "less is more" but pencils weren't giving me enough coverage, so dug out my Winsor & Newton watercolour paint sticks... I've included this closeup to show the amount of paint used, hardly any compared to how I usually work. I love the texture of pencils and paint sticks on rough paper!

Haiku Watercolour Painting by Jenny James - waiting for paint to dry
I painted more water onto the page (dissolving the paint sticks) and let it dry again... the second fish decided it didn't want to join us, so that's where the quote is going.

Haiku Watercolour Painting by Jenny James - more layers of paint in blues and greens
"Trust the Mess" ... that's what we're told to do so many times with abstract art and other types of creativity, but its harder to do than waiting for paint to dry! lol :) Took a couple of hours this time.
This photo is showing what happens when you give up on micro layers and just go for it. Thank goodness its meant to look like water hey? At this point, I felt happy with the clouds and tiny forest in the background but the rest is such a mess!

Haiku Watercolour Painting by Jenny James - photo of my workspace
This is my favourite palette! This pic was after adding pink gouache to the petals, brown to the stems and shadows in the water.
Things we take photos of when waiting (again) for paint to dry...!

Haiku Watercolour Painting by Jenny James - work in progress
I really love painting with watercolours... especially when its working! Above is showing that messy page after it dried completely (lovely!) and includes the details added - lily pads, flower and leaf stems, bit more blue in the water and reflections under the waterlilies, forest and lily pads.

Haiku Watercolour Painting by Jenny James - Dragonflies Hover Above the Waterlilies Hungry are the Fish
The flowers are painted using the magenta paint and brown for the shaping and shadows.
All that's left to do are all the bubbles, the fish's details and other bits and pieces.

Haiku Watercolour Painting by Jenny James - adding details to the fish
Here fishy fishy... meet my giant goldfish eyeing off the dragonflies above. The bubbles have white paint pen highlights and brown paint underneath to make them appear round.

Haiku Watercolour Painting by Jenny James - finished picture of dragonflies hovering over waterlilies
Sorry, no progress pics for the dragonflies.... they weren't behaving! Thank goodness they turned out ok... especially after they'd dried. When the wings were still wet, they looked really dark but dried with a satisfying transparent finish.

To make the dragonflies, I used a sharp black water-soluble pencil to draw an oval for the abdomen, long super skinny tube shape for the body and long triangular ovalish shapes for wings. Add a bit of green to the body then using a fine wet paint brush and blend out the colours trying to keep the black to the outer edges.
Add fine wobbly lines for the wing veins and antennae using a very fine paint brush (or pen) in black. Eyes are spots using white paint pen.
I used more pencils and watercolours (using a dry paintbrush)  to add depth and shadow to everything.

Haiku Watercolour Painting by Jenny James - finished picture of the hand lettering under the waterlilies
The lettering for the quote is drawn freehand with pale blue pencil then I went over it (sort of) with black pencil. Then using the blue pencil again, I added extra words to make the dodgy bits look like they were meant to be there (of course they were).

Haiku poems need to have a certain amount of syllables in each line... 1st is 5 syllables, 2nd is 7, 3rd is 5. Thankfully it doesn't need to rhyme but it should make a bit of sense and relate directly to the artwork. Definitely a challenge, but one I enjoyed :) You should have a go too!

Then the 3 little fishes with their teeny tiny bubbles were drawn in too, just because. The writing is all a bit crooked, but then again, it is underwater! lol :)

Haiku Watercolour Painting by Jenny James - finished artwork of dragonflies hovering over waterlilies with koi fish
So this is my finished artwork for the theme, Haiku Art Page.

Thanks so much for visiting and reading my blog post. Hope my instructions help and it inspires you to have a go. The main thing to remember with watercolour painting, is to let the layers dry completely before adding more colour. Unless you're trying to create marbled blends then that's a whole other way to play!

Have a happy creative day!
:)
Jenny

Saturday, July 13, 2019

How to Make 3D Bees

This mixed media tutorial featuring honey bees and sunflowers was created using Sizzix Framelits "Entomology" by Tim Holtz, Dylusions Stamps "Sunshine Girl" and Ranger's 3D Clear Foam Tape... plus repurposed packaging (black card and cellophane) and a few other arty treasures.

mixed media artwork by Jenny James featuring sunflowers, bees and their hive
I used the black cardstock from the packaging of the Darkroom Door large stencils... its quire a solid colour and the card is smooth and sturdy. When I want to colour my die cut shapes, I usually use Tim's packaging as its a light brown with interesting texture or start with white watercolour or mixed media paper. But bees are usually brown or black and yellow :)

First thing I did was trim the black cardstock into 2.5" strips. Using my Sizzix Sidekick with the bee from Entomology Framelits and the two cutting pads, I cut out dozens of bees. Even one bee at a time doesn't take long. I cut out heaps of ants too but didn't end up using them for my page.

As a die cutting template is like a cookie cutter and presses out the shapes, the finished shape has two sides... the upper side has smooth rounded edges, the underneath has a sharper edge. I prefer to have the rounded edge as my right side.

Each bee had their stripes added using Pure Sunshine (yellow) Dylusions Paint Pen.

recycling and giving purpose to packaging
The wings are all cut out of cellophane, also from stencil packaging. Cello packets are found with all sorts of products, I tend to keep it all in a drawer along with acetate packing that might be useful. Its not hoarding at all, its saving and recycling!

Cutting fine cellophane can be done with a few sheets at the same time. How many will depend on your machine and thickness of cello you use.
The cello may get squashed together but separates again easily enough.

Iridescent shimmer can be added to cello with glitter glue or glue with dry glitter and left to dry. I used one called holographic glitter... so pretty! Being plastic, it can take longer to dry but is worth it.

Experiment with your glue as some won't stick to cello - but then if it falls of later, what a fab excuse to get out the glitter again! 

mixed media artwork by Jenny James featuring sunflowers, bees and their hive
The black bees had their wings cut off with fine sharp scissors. I felt so mean doing that, but reassured them that they'd all get new prettier wings!

At first, the two layers, cardstock and cello, were adhered together carefully lining them up so only the wings were showing. It proved tricky so I trimmed off all the legs from the cello bees leaving only wings with bodies. Adhering the two layers is much easier this way because if they're crooked the legs don't give it away!

finished mixed media artwork by Jenny James featuring sunflowers, bees and their hive
To add the bees to the page so they were raised, I used Ranger's thick clear foam tape, stuck just underneath the body hidden from view.

Shown above are words from Tim Holtz Idea-Ology Chipboard Quotes. I've trimmed one quote with sharp scissors so it could be stacked.
The pretty pattern under the quote is made using washi tape, trimmed to look like bunting.

finished mixed media artwork by Jenny James featuring sunflowers, bees and their hive
Close up of my bees... I added more holographic glitter to the bodies and antennae as well.

The sunflowers were created using the flower from Dylusions by Dyan Reaveley stamp set, Sunshine Girl. Each flower was coloured with various inks (yellow, brown, green) plus spots of white paint pen for highlights.

finished mixed media artwork by Jenny James featuring sunflowers, bees and their hive
Above shows my finished page featuring the swarm of bees taking the scenic route home.

The background was made using Dylusions Ink Sprays with Tim Holtz Distress Oxide Sprays. The page was upright so the sprayed ink ran down the page, leaving a stripy texture. Both sides of the page were coloured this way.

Once the spray ink had dried, which took a day or two because I was a bit heavy handed with ink,  I blended Dylusions Paint in Dirty Martini, Lemon Zest and White Linen through various stencils in honeycomb and hexagon designs.

finished mixed media artwork by Jenny James featuring sunflowers, bees and their hive
Here's the other side of the page ... The rough looking honeycomb is Finnabair Plaster Paste. I spread the paste on a stencil then pressed it onto the page like a stamp.

Also shown is a strip of Tim Holtz Wallflower Vellum Paper (left), Idea-Ology Journaling Card (under the beehive), washi tape and a hive made of sticky back canvas coloured with Derwent Inktense Pencils.

I hope my 3D bees and sunflowers inspire you to take the scenic route and get adventurous with your art supplies and recycled materials. Sing out if you need a hand and have fun!

Happy Creative Day!
:)
Jenny

Wednesday, June 26, 2019

Book Art Journal Page - Underwater Library

artwork by Jenny James featuring Book Art with an Under the Sea Fairy StoryThis art journal page was created for the theme "Book Art". The artwork seemed to have a mind of its own at times, but like all good stories, had a happy ending.

My underwater world featuring adorable crabs, narwhals and bubbles of text was created using Tim Holtz Collage Paper, vintage book pages, Distress Inks and Paints, matte gel medium, Spray Inks, string, Finnabair stickers and a variety of stamps by Tim Holtz, Dylusions, Jane Davenport and Darkroom Door.

In the Beginning...

Choose 2 contrasting blue paints (I used Tim Holtz Distress Paint in Peacock Feathers and Tumbled Glass). Drip small amounts of both colours onto the surface. You don't need much if its a fluid paint.

artwork by Jenny James featuring Book Art with an Under the Sea Fairy Story
Using a seasponge press lightly everywhere all over the page, covering the whole surface but at the same time, leaving speckles of white areas here and there.

If you don't have a seasponge or a coarse sponge, scrunch up a dry piece of paper towel (kitchen paper) so it has a rough, random appearance.

artwork by Jenny James featuring Book Art with an Under the Sea Fairy Story
Next, spray or splatter the surface with Dylusions Ink Spray in both Lemon Zest and White Linen.
Mist with water to blend (it breaks up the blues) and then spray or splatter Dylusions Ink Spray in London Blue.

Lightly press paper towel over the whole page to reduce any puddles of excess ink. Some puddles you might want to leave as they'll dry eventually. Our paper towel has wavy lines embossed, so any marks left behind would look like waves.
Alternatively, select another sheet of paper and press over the whole surface - this gives you a second background to use another day.

Sprials shown in the photo above are created using a thick black foam stamp with light blue Distress Paint (Tumbled Glass). In hindsight, white would have looked better as the blue appeared to blend into the background (it was too similar).

Leave to dry for a few hours or a few days... time depends on availability and how much paint / ink was used! While waiting, create all the scenery and characters.

Creating Characters...

I'm not fond of ripping up books, even ones I don't like so I'm grateful to have been given a few pages as part of a swap. Stamping out text, script and sheet music with an Archival Ink beforehand would give the same effect.

artwork by Jenny James featuring Book Art with an Under the Sea Fairy Story
Using a blue coloured pencil, I drew dozens of scribbly circles (bubbles) and a daisy (which was turned into more circles). Use a regular, non-soluble pencil so it won't disappear if it gets wet.
Each circle was cut out by hand with scissors. Use up the page by drawing more circles and cutting them out. All leftovers were kept to one side (they get turned into rocks and seaweed).

artwork by Jenny James featuring Book Art with an Under the Sea Fairy Story
I don't have a before and after photo of the stamped narwhals, crab and books ... but this is how they were made :
- Stamp the narwhals and crab in black Archival ink onto readymade pages or stamped paper.
- Stamp the Open Book and pile of books in brown Archival ink.
- Cut out the animals using fine pointed scissors and dust all edges with Distress Ink (Walnut Stain, dark brown).
- Blend grey Distress Ink (Pumice Stone) over the abdomen of the Narwhals (making sure to leave their fins clean).
- Blend Distress Ink over the page sides and spines of both book images using a warm brown and very dark brown Distress Ink (Vintage Photo and Ground Espresso).
- Splatter lightly with water, then once dry, blend Black Soot roughly around the same areas to give a mottled, rugged look.
- To give a vintage look to the pages, lightly blend over brown and grey ink before gluing in place.
- Once the books are dry, give them another blending of ink to deepen the colours.

Set all elements aside while finishing the background. Don't throw any bits out just yet!

FYI, the stamps I used were ... "Narwhal" by Jane Davenport, little crab from "Under the Sea" by Dyan Reaveley, both books are from Darkroom Door (Bookworm stamp set and Open Book frame stamp).

The Background...

The background should be dry by now. To make it more like an ocean, print with various stamps using a mid green Archival Ink Pad (for the illusion of undergrowth and seaweed).

artwork by Jenny James featuring Book Art with an Under the Sea Fairy Story
The writing you can see scattered across the page is the background image from the Tim Holtz Entomology Stamp Set (the gorgeous insects collection).
The halftone dots across the base of the page is from Tim's Psychedelic Grunge Stamp Set (one of my faves, it has such groovy textures).

artwork by Jenny James featuring Book Art with an Under the Sea Fairy Story
Using a gel matte medium, I glued down torn pieces of Tim Holtz collage tissue "Melange", a beautiful design, full of butterflies, moths and music.
You don't have to worry too much with any of Tim's collage tissue papers, when glued down in this way the design remains the focus while the opaque paper seems to disappear into the background.

To make rocks and seaweed, fussy cut and tear the leftovers you put aside earlier into strips and odd shapes.
Glue down using the gel matte mediums and then add the crab, books, narwhals and bubbles to the page.

Thankfully the gel medium takes a little while to dry so you have time to move elements around until they're where you want them. Don't forget though, that tissue and vintage paper is fragile when wet!

Leave to dry, overnight if you can... with so much glue and paint, it might take a while! At this point in my page, I wasn't fond of the colours... but thankfully once dry, it was more olde worlde than grey grunge!

Adding Details and Other Elements...

Using Walnut Stain Distress Ink or dark brown watercolour paint, add shadows to the crab, rocks and seaweed with a paintbrush.

artwork by Jenny James featuring Book Art with an Under the Sea Fairy Story
The quote on the right hand side are from stickers by Finnabair (Sentiments Sticker Book) and says "Give a Voice to Your Story".

artwork by Jenny James featuring Book Art with an Under the Sea Fairy Story
Add Ranger's Glossy Accents (a 3D shiny varnish) to edges of most of the books (not all) and other areas to give the impression that they're all wet.

For a mini bookmark, add a tiny paperclip from Tim Holtz's Idea-Ology collection tied with a Distress Ink stained piece of muslin.

artwork by Jenny James featuring Book Art with an Under the Sea Fairy Story
The narwhals had a pretty glitter glue on their horns then a splash of Glossy over the top.
The crab was given shiny eyes and had his book dunked in "water" aka Glossy while all the bubbles were coated with Ranger's Gloss Texture Paste.

artwork by Jenny James featuring Book Art with an Under the Sea Fairy Story
The above photo shows the whole page so far... just when I thought it was finished. But then I had a delivery in the shop of a whole new collection of arty treasures... Tim's groovy Idea-Ology Baseboard Dolls and the gorgeous Transparent Wings! The page didn't feel finished anyway! lol :)

Finishing Off...

I simply had to use the Wings and Baseboard Dolls somehow, so chose the one seated and gave her wings so she could fly!

To make the ocean coloured string, I started with a yellow one and stained it using Peacock Feathers Distress Ink Pad. Tap the ink pad onto the craft mat. Loop the string into a curl and smoosh into the ink on the mat, then spray with water. Move the string around in the puddle of watery ink. Wipe up the excess ink or the string will be too soggy.

Add a 20 cent piece sized puddle of gel matte medium to the craft mat and mix in the string until it is coated with the glue.

While the glue (gel matte medium) is still wet, curl the string around and around on the page to represent waves in the sea.
Being a matte medium, it will dry clear and blend into the background. If you used other kinds of glue, they may remain visible even after they're dry.

artwork by Jenny James featuring Book Art with an Under the Sea Fairy Story
Dolly's Transparent Wings were coated with iridescent glitter glue underneath so the veins of the wings weren't covered. Her dress has splashes of Glossy Accents (it got everywhere).

How not to add Dolly : I glued the doll down with gel matte medium... then lifted her to add the wings, then lifted her again to add the glitter glue to the wings... then once more to add the ends of string underneath. I don't recommend this "technique" but luckily she's a tough dolly and didn't hurt her a bit!

Its a better idea to apply glitter glue to the wings and let it dry before adding the wings onto the doll or the page.
When staining Paper Dolls or Baseboard Dolls, decide on a colour before starting because it doesn't come off again!

artwork by Jenny James featuring Book Art with an Under the Sea Fairy Story
So here it is... my finished art journal page. Click the image to view bigger. I always find it interesting to see how the artwork changes with every layer and element added.
For me, this is a little friendly crab telling stories and sharing books with his fairy and narwhal friends while hanging out in an underwater library. Maybe its a poetry reading!

Thanks so much for visiting and checking out my journal page. I hope it makes you smile too!

Have a wonderful, happy creative day!
:)
Jenny

Sunday, May 26, 2019

Dreamer of Dreams Art Journal Page

This art journal page was created inside a friend's book (as part of a swap for the Australian Art Journal Swap group) using the theme, All About Me. So I've "painted" a beautiful garden of daisies, I've used Dylusions Acrylic Paint with various stencils and my favourite colour, green.


Arty Treasures used ...

- Dylusions Acrylic Paint
... Dirty Martini, Cut Grass, Lemon Zest, Pure Sunshine, White Linen, Slate Grey, Black Marble
- Dylusions Stencils
... Squares, Flossie (you could use Maisie, Martha, Ben or any other mask), Its Raining Cats, Keyholes, Spring Bloom (large and small)
- Tim Holtz Stencils
... Organic
- Darkroom Door Stencils
... Wildflowers (large)
- Finnabair Paint Brushes
- Ranger's Mini Ink Blending Tools and Foams
- Tim Holtz Idea-Ology Embellishments
... Snarky Stickers, Chipboard Quotes, Metallic Quotations
- Dylusions Glue Stick
- Washi Tape or Purple Painters' Tape

All available at the 'Art by Jenny' online shop

The Background...

the blank slate for Jenny's garden of daisies art journal page step-by-step tutorial
Sometimes its useful to see exactly how a page begins so I've included a photo showing you the blank slate.
The colourful border around the paper is scrap paper that I've put underneath, protecting the other pages in my friend's book. I've also placed a strip of book tape (its like translucent washi tape) along the spine. This gives a smoother surface and helps stop paint from leaking into the spine.

Before you get started, gather your favourite colour paint for the background with the other main colours. Aside from look fabulous on the table, its useful to have the colours you're using nearby. Also gather all the tools you need so you don't have to go searching later. The stencils I gather while waiting for paint to dry as often, what I want to use changes with my mood or ideas that fly around my brain!

layering acrylic paint on Jenny's garden of daisies art journal page step-by-step tutorial
Using a paint brush or ink blending foam tool, paint or blend (also called smoosh) Dylusions Acrylic Paint diagonally across the page... I started off with Dirty Martini (earthy green), then on the rest of the page, Cut Grass (bright green). I worked in circles but it doesn't matter what it looks like at this stage, you're just creating a base coat.

Important : Dylusions Acrylic Paint Housekeeping ... don't forget to put the lids on your jars of paint so the moisture doesn't evaporate while you work. When you've finished for the day, spray clean water into each colour (1 or 2 pumps will do), put the lid back on and give it a little shake. This puts back any moisture that escaped when you weren't looking, ensuring the paint is beautifully smooth and creamy for next time.

layering acrylic paint on Jenny's garden of daisies art journal page step-by-step tutorial
Add another colour of paint over the page lightly (so not covering every inch) using a sea sponge, blending tool, texture tools or roller to create subtle texture. I've used Polished Jade with a coarse synthetic sponge roller.
The next step is to wait for the paint to dry. Sometimes the hardest thing to do!

how to use masks and stencils on Jenny's garden of daisies art journal page step-by-step tutorial

Once dry, attach a temporary tape to the back of a mask or stencil and place on the page. This mask keeps an area of the page in its original colour. I missed a photo at this point, but you can see the mask of a girl underneath the squares above :)

This mask is named 'Flossie', a silhouette of a girl by Dyan Reaveley. Dyan's current designs are Jay, Ellie, Ben, Maureen, Martha and Maisie. Each set has both the inner and outer (positive and negative) of each character in various sizes. I've used the middle child :)

how to use washi tape on stencils for Jenny's garden of daisies art journal page step-by-step tutorial
To make a double sided tape from single sided tape... Wrap the temporary tape in a loop with the sticky side out, place on the mask and press lightly onto the surface, just enough for the mask not to move.
Also, if you're worried the tape is too sticky, simply press it down onto a piece of fabric (not a fluffy piece!) and lift off again. Depending on your tape, it may need doing a couple of times.

This is a great way to hold stencils and masks that don't have enough room for fingers, if you have limited mobility, or want to add multiple layers without it moving, like we are here.

If I didn't tape Flossie down, she'd end up leaving paint marks every time she was nudged. Not that it would be the end of the world as you could fix that by saying its just how its mean to be or doodling around the image after it was dry :)

The easiest way to get started it to begin... I sound like Mary Poppins or Maria from Sound of Music! lol :)

creating a background for Jenny's garden of daisies art journal page step-by-step tutorial
Anyway, I began by blending Dylusions Lemon Zest paint through the Dylusions large stencils, Squares and Its Raining Cats. I've used a clean foam on my Mini Ink Blending Tool to keep the yellow fresh.
To choose stencils, use those that either compliment your theme or simply make you smile!

creating a background for Jenny's garden of daisies art journal page step-by-step tutorial
Next add a large simple design in a contrasting or shadow colour (I used Dylusions Slate Grey). This is the Darkroom Door large stencil, Wildflowers. Can you see Flossie?

creating a background for Jenny's garden of daisies art journal page step-by-step tutorial
Shown above is the background drying while I was deciding which other stencils to use... I chose the Dylusions small Keyholes and Tim Holtz Layering Stencil called Organic. They were added wherever there was a large gap between the squares and cats, using the Lemon Zest and again, the ink blending tool.

Just a quick note : I grew up using stencils with a stencil brush. Its a bristly rough round, flat ended brush that always ended up pushing paint under a stencil. It wasn't the brush's fault as I do use a fair bit of paint when I work but since discovering these marvellous round foams, it hardly ever happens. The bristly brushes are now only used when I want to stipple, create spotty patterns or add splatters.

The next step of adding all the white flowers needs to be done after everything is dry so the white paint doesn't blend into the other colours.

The Daisies...

Daisies are my most favourite flower ... all kinds including Gazanias, Sunflowers, Marigolds, Gerberas, Chrysanthemums, Dandelions - they're all such friendly flowers.

using stencils to make flowers on Jenny's garden of daisies art journal page step-by-step tutorial
All the daisies were added using both the large and small Dylusions stencils called "Spring Bloom". First the larger ones then the smaller ones to fill holes or grow the garden higher. I've used Dylusions White Linen acrylic paint and an ink blending tool (a clean foam as its white!).

After one coat of paint, it dries to a semi-translucent finish. Leave them to dry.

painting flowers on Jenny's garden of daisies art journal page step-by-step tutorial
Once dried, painted all the larger flowers and some of the smaller ones with a small round paintbrush (round no.4), again using White Linen. Leave some unpainted so they appear to be further away.

overview of flowers on Jenny's garden of daisies art journal page step-by-step tutorial
Adding white spots everywhere gave the garden a whimsical look. Hold the paintbrush vertical and simply dot the surface using a different pressure for different sized dots.

closeup of flowers on Jenny's garden of daisies art journal page step-by-step tutorial
The centres of all the daisies were created in the same manner using Dylusions Slate Grey acrylic paint and the same paintbrush.
Starting off a flower centre with a neutral colour helps guide the size and shading. It can easily be painted over with another colour, whether lighter or darker if you want to change their spots.

closeup of flowers on Jenny's garden of daisies art journal page step-by-step tutorial
So that the flower spots don't blend together and remain as little round spots, wait for each colour to dry. Don't worry if your spots aren't perfectly circular... some spots will appear squashed while others look like round speckles... just go with it. There are no mistakes in art!

closeup of flowers on Jenny's garden of daisies art journal page step-by-step tutorial
The spots for the centres were painted in this colour order... Slate Grey, Pure Sunshine, Lemon Zest, White Linen and lastly, Black Marble.
Keeping the black to just around the bottom area of each centre while the white spots are towards the top left of each centre, helps give an impression that its a raised rounded shape.

lifting the mask off Jenny's garden of daisies art journal page step-by-step tutorial
Carefully lift off your mask. Don't forget to wash the paint off before it sets but don't panic because you can always use a mild soap with a soft nailbrush to wash these stencils as they're a durable plastic :)

Jenny's garden of daisies art journal page step-by-step tutorial
To emphasize Flossie's shape that was left behind from the mask, paint a wash of black to add shadows on the inner edge of the shape. Just like the flower centres, this gives the eyes an idea that the shape might be rounded.

You can create a wash with 5 parts matte medium with 1 part paint (use gloss medium if your paint dries shiny).
Or if you're not fussed about exact quantities ... simply use a paintbrush to put a spot of paint on a palette or craft mat, then add matte medium until its a puddle of very translucent black paint. It will look watery as if there's not much black in it at all.

Use the small round paintbrush to blend around the inner edges of one side of the marks (I've chosen the right hand side, as if the light is from the top left).

Quick note on shadows ... Unless you're a movie star where light comes from all kinds of directions so there are no shadows, lighting is usually from one direction. I usually always end up creating shadows that appear as if the light is from the top left corner of a page. One day I'll mix it up and move the sun so I can have the shadows somewhere else! lol :)

Other ways of adding shadows are to use markers, pencils, crayons, watercolour markers or watersoluble crayons. Make sure you wait 12-24 hours before using pencils and markers. The paint needs to be completely cured so the pencils don't tear the paper and the markers don't get blocked.

The main thing about shadows is to ensure its not a solid coverage of black. That it allows the colours to show through, softly blending into the rest of the shape. If you look at most shadows, you'll see most have soft fuzzy edges - unless its a very bright light.

Adding Thoughts...

finished artwork of Jenny's garden of daisies art journal page step-by-step tutorial
To finish off the page with some thoughts, why not use stamps, your own handwriting or stickers?

I used a mixture of words from Tim Holtz Snarky Stickers, Chipboard Quotes and Metallic Quotations.
I've applied Dylusions Glue Stick to them all, even the stickers, so they're there forever!

So this is me... Dreamer of dreams, feeling free to fly while creating art from the heart in my happy place! The little frog in the corner is a sticker too, making this page about me complete (I love frogs!).

Tim's Snarky quote in the top left hand corner says "We never really grow up, we only learn how to act in public." - who says we have to grow up anyway? lol :D

Thanks so much for reading and checking out my journal page. I hope it makes you smile and encourages you to have a go. I'm here if you need help anytime :) Have fun!

Have a wonderful, happy creative day!
:)
Jenny

Shop Online at 'Art by Jenny' for FREE delivery Australia wide

Shop Online at 'Art by Jenny' for FREE delivery Australia wide
Get the latest treasures by Tim Holtz, Dyan Reaveley, Darkroom Door, Finnabair by Prima Marketing and more! 'Art by Jenny' is an online shop that is a curated collection of art and craft supplies, chosen because of their amazing designs, gorgeous colours, outstanding qualities and performance! Free delivery throughout all of Australia.

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